alexander method of posture correction

alexander method of posture correction

There’s evidence suggesting the Alexander technique can help people with:
The teacher will observe your movements and show you how to move, sit, lie down and stand with better balance and less strain. They’ll use their hands to gently guide you in your movements, help you maintain a better relationship between your head, neck and spine, and to release muscle tension.

Alexander method of posture correction
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alexander technique

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Alexander method of posture correction
Constructively resting is simply lying down on the floor. A bed or a couch would be too soft: try a hard surface, like a carpeted floor, or a yoga mat, so that you can feel the floor beneath yourself. Your head can be supported on either a pillow, towel, or even some soft books or clothes, and your hands should remain at either your sides or gently on your stomach.
For an example video, hosted by Ron Murdock, on the proper techniques surrounding the Whispered “Ahh” in the Alexander Technique, view the video here:

The posture problem
You look in the mirror and you’re not happy with what you see. Maybe your shoulders round forward. Your butt sticks out. Your knees point in. You don’t like your walk. You can’t stand that stoop. Maybe you try to fix the problem by listening to the familiar voices in your head — “Stand up straight!” “Tuck your pelvis!” “Pull your shoulders back!” “Hold your head up!” You try arranging body parts.You tuck your pelvis. You straighten up. It looks better, but feels like so much work.You let go, and there’s the same old posture again. You figure you’re lazy or too tightly wound or out of shape. Maybe you think your posture runs in the family.

By Joan Arnold and Hope Gillerman with Terry Zimmerer

Alexander method of posture correction
A short introduction on how aspects of the Alexander Technique can help you when sitting at a computer and correct forward head posture.
Are you looking to improve your posture, health and performance in your working day?

References:

http://www.alexandertechnique.com/
http://ergonomictrends.com/alexander-technique-exercises-posture-back-pain/
http://alexandertechnique.com/articles/posture
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=XkrIvOTtEGY
http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/alexander-technique/

preschool classroom management 150 teacher tested techniques

preschool classroom management 150 teacher tested techniques

Preschool classroom management 150 teacher tested techniques
Quantity Available: 1
From: AussieBookSeller (Lidcombe, NSW, Australia)

Intent-to-Treat: The sources of missing data and the procedure used to deal with the missing data are unclear. Nearly all students were included (98%) in the student analyses and most teachers were included (90%) in the teacher analyses.
Contact Person: Judy Ohm or Angie Clair
Organization Name: Wilder Foundation, Parent Education Center
Address: 451 Lexington Pkwy. North, St. Paul, MN 55104
Phone: 651-280-2606
Email: [email protected]
Organization URL: Wilder.org

References:

http://www.blueprintsprograms.org/programs/699999999/incredible-years-teacher-classroom-management/print/
http://www.gmu.edu/facstaff/part-time/strategy.html

alexander technique nj

alexander technique nj

Alexander technique nj
This years campaign, Look, Feel, and Grow Younger with the Alexander Technique, focuses on the commonly seen benefits individuals experience when learning this work. As a part of this effort, Center Studio, is holding a free lecture/demonstration at the Hoboken Public Library on Wednesday, October 23 at 6.00PM to inform the public about the lifelong benefits that the Technique has to offer.
The Art Of Aging – A Secret In Health

Alexander technique nj

    Arrange for a Skype session with one of the teachers listed here.

Need a Website?
If you are an Alexander Technique teacher, and want to have your own website, and have it listed on this site click here.
Learn how you can have one quickly, and very inexpensively – no technical knowledge needed!

Alexander technique nj
Michael Veilleux is a nationally board-certified Alexander Technique teacher and Reiki Practitioner with a background in dance and performing arts. He teaches students to optimize their movement potential, and empowers them to change how their bodies look, feel and function.
About Michael Veilleux

Alexander technique nj
He is a certified teacher by ATI (A-T International) and ISTAT (Israel Society of Teachers of the A-T). He trained at the Philadelphia School for the A-T with Martha Hansen-Fertman, Ed. D., and has additionally studied in Israel, NYC, New Jersey, Cambridge (MA) and Sweet Briar (VA), and prior to training with Goddard Binkley and others. He teaches in the US and Israel. His practice includes lessons to US veterans (Integrative Medicine, V.A. Hospital, East Orange, NJ).
The Alexander Technique (A-T) is an experiential learning method for improving integrative mind-body awareness in movement as applied in performing with musical instruments or singing. A-T lessons are also helpful in recuperating from highly demanding practicing rehearsals and performances, and in the prevention or reduction of pain, restrictions or injuries which may be experienced by musicians (e.g., of muscles, joints, neck, shoulders, arms, elbow, wrists, fingers, back, legs, knees, feet, vocal organs, breathing, chest, embouchure-related, and those related to fatigue, anxiety or stage fright).

Alexander technique nj
Whether you are performing with your instrument/voice, acting out a monologue, looking to decrease your level of fatigue in the dance studio, or working with typing at the computer, you will gain a clearer kinesthetic as well as anatomical understanding of what goes on in our bodies as we go about our lives. After as little as one session, people often notice a dramatic improvement in skill, coordination, and stress management, among others. Learn to sync up with the body’s natural design for improved performance and ease while potentially avoiding injury.
Reduce chronic pain (back, neck, tension headaches, etc.)

References:

http://www.alexandertechnique.com/teacher/
http://patch.com/new-jersey/madison/ev–alexander-technique-with-michael-veilleux
http://www.njworkshopforthearts.com/faculty/alexander-technique-ruben/
http://www.jamesblumer.com/alexandertechnique
http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/alexander-technique/

the alexander technique seattle

the alexander technique seattle

The alexander technique seattle

Residential Alexander Technique
Courses and Workshops:


Most Alexander Technique professional societies maintain a list of courses and workshops taught by their members. The websites of these societies are listed on the teachers’ lists (the three links at the top of this page) below the links to individual teacher’s websites – which themselves may contain information about classes and workshops offered in their areas.

The alexander technique seattle
It is well past time to cooperate with human design in a way that insists on nourishing our integrated self.
Posted on February 6, 2015 by Cathy Madden. This entry was posted in Staying Healthy. Bookmark the permalink.

Cathy Madden is Principal Lecturer for the University of Washington’s Professional Actor Training Program, Director of the Alexander Technique Training and Performance Studio in Seattle, and Associate Director/Research Director for ATA/BodyChance (Japan, Australia). Her book Integrative Alexander Technique Practices for Performing Artists : Onstage Synergy was published by Intellect Ltd. in 2014.
She has been a featured presenter/keynote speaker at International Congresses of the Alexander Technique, Alexander Technique International Annual General Meetings and for the Freedom to Act Conference. In 2012, she was the Keynote Speaker for the Inaugural Alexander Technique and Performing Arts Conference in Melbourne.

The alexander technique seattle

  • What is performance?
  • What is the difference between “Performance” as we usually think of it—acting, dancing, singing, playing music, athletics, etc.—and “performance”—what we do in every day life?
  • What is it about truly great performances that makes them great?
  • What qualities do those performers have, and how can we all have those qualities in our daily lives?

Our exploration of these questions is grounded in the work of F.M. Alexander, who discovered fundamental principles of human movement and coordination. Using Alexander’s discoveries as a framework, we have pioneered powerful and practical approaches to understanding and improving human coordination. We work with people in all walks of life, individually or in groups, at work and at home, on any activity they want to do with more ease, flexibility, comfort and style. We believe that nothing is more fascinating or fun than learning about ourselves, and the joy of our work is helping people realize the power, clarity and potential of well-coordinated thinking. We hope you will come play with us.
Our work comes from a deep curiosity about the nature of human performance.

The alexander technique seattle
The Alexander Technique is learned on an individual basis through taking private lessons. For information on taking lessons at the Alexander Technique Center of Washington, e-mail [email protected] or phone: (703) 821-2920.
Marian Goldberg maintains a private Alexander Technique teaching practice in the Washington, D.C. area and is the Director of the Alexander Technique Center’s Teacher-Training Program. Marian began studying the Alexander Technique in 1978. After working with a variety of interpretations of the Technique from 1978 to 1980, she went on to study with Joan and Alexander Murray at the Urbana Center for the Alexander Technique in 1980. Marian graduated from the Urbana Center’s intensive teacher-training program in 1983, fulfilling the three-year daily training requirements established by F. Matthias Alexander, the creator of the Alexander Technique. In addition, Marian completed two years of advanced training at the Urbana Center. She has been teaching the Technique since 1983 and is certified by both the Society of Teachers of the Alexander Technique (STAT), UK, and the American Society for the Alexander Technique (AmSAT). Marian has also studied with teachers directly trained by F. Matthias Alexander: Walter Carrington, Peggy Williams, and Marjorie Barstow. She has taught classes and workshops in the Technique for colleges and universities and for a number of organizations, including the United States Marine Band, the University of Illinois, and the Vocal Studies Program at George Mason University. Her articles have appeared in several publications, including The Alternative Health Sourcebook and Natural Awakenings magazine. Marian has developed several web sites: “Alexander Technique: The Insiders’ Guide,” “John Dewey and the Alexander Technique” and “The Alexander Technique for Musicians.” She is the editor of Beginning from the Beginning: A Conversation with Joan and Alexander Murray. Marian has also been certified as a FeldenkraisВ® Practitioner and has trained in Cranio-Sacral Therapy.

References:

http://thewholeu.uw.edu/2015/02/06/the-alexander-technique/
http://www.alexanderstudies.org/people/madden-cathy
http://performanceschool.org/
http://www.alexandercenter.com/mobile/the-alexander-center.html
http://www.alexandertechnique.com/teacher/

alexander technique youtube

alexander technique youtube

Until recently, most Alexander Technique archive clips have been locked away, gathering dust. In January 2008, STAT (The Society of Teachers of the Alexander Technique) launched their own YouTube channel, posting 29 videos which have so far had over 16,000 views between them.
http://www.youtube.com/user/davidreedmedia
…which has a variety of videos of lessons and workshops, including a video of a 1999 workshop with Walter Carrington:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gFgbp6WveFg

Alexander technique youtube
Don’t feel out of the loop if you’re unfamiliar with the Alexander Technique.
I am an extraordinary performance coach, and I use the AT (I am a certified teacher, as well as professional performer) to coach the most elite performers in the world. (Cirque du Soleil, Broadway, marathon runners, etc.) What we do is use the principles of peak performance, human design, movement and thought to do the things we most desire.

Alexander technique youtube
And now… (Throwing a ball)
People notice a difference even after a short series of lessons.

Alexander technique youtube
Improved performance and public speaking
A study published in the British Medical Journal concluded that the Alexander Technique, coupled with walking, “. seems the most effective and cost effective option for the treatment of back pain. ”
The Alexander Technique doesn’t actually treat back pain. Most of your aches and pains are probably caused by how you do things. Alexander will show you how to be effortlessly upright, and to move more naturally; how to stop doing the things that cause the pain.

Alexander technique youtube
The Alexander Technique reawakens natural poise so that the mind and body can work in harmony, avoiding stress responses to the environment we live in. Free flowing coordination replaces habitual tensions and that helps young people in every aspect of their lives.
There are many good reasons to introduce Alexander’s ideas to children and teenagers. Articles in the media increasingly report that young people are experiencing more backache, discomfort, stress and anxiety. Whereas education is often geared towards goal setting and exams, Alexander lessons help young people to take a step back, find resources within themselves, and achieve their goals more easily.

References:

http://theunconventionalroute.com/alexander-technique-review/
http://www.markjosefsberg.com/alexander-technique-video-2/
http://www.alexandertech.co.uk/
http://alexandertechnique.co.uk/education
http://www.alexandertechnique.com/

alexander technique sitting

alexander technique sitting

Alexander technique sitting
If your office chair tilts backwards allowing you to come to rest against the back support this is still likely to be another form of collapse. As I have mentioned in the past, you could think of this as elegant repose in order to do it well, but if you are honest with yourself you’ll have allowed the muscle tone of your torso to go limp. And what’s wrong with that if your back is being supported? Well, your arms are an extension of your back!
The surface that you sit on is also a huge contributing factor in how you sit, but as long as it is flat and firm it will do. My motto is “if you can stand on it, you can sit on it”. Ignoring that most office chairs swivel, it is the support that the surface provides I’m interested in here, so I don’t want you to have an accident at work now!

Alexander technique sitting
Make sure your body is rid of tension before lying down.
Repeat this exercise every single day for at least a year and watch your spine relax more every day.

Alexander technique sitting

  • Your body is designed to move. Do not sit for long periods of time. Get up and move.
  • Notice your body moving with your breath while you are at the computer
  • Yawn and stretch throughout the time you are at the computer
  • Give yourself the most space possible across your chest and abdominal wall
  • Allow your spine to have length along the curves (You don’t want to straighten the spine)
  • Have the bottom of your feet flat on the floor or some other surface

So many of my clients, whether they are actors, speakers, doctors, or editors, have to sit at a computer for their business. Almost everyone has a website or a social media presence which requires them to sit at a computer. Kids now have to do their homework on iPads or computers. One reason I chose Alexander Technique as a career was because I did not want a job where I had to sit at a computer. Even I have to spend time at a computer writing blog posts, sending emails to clients, and doing accounting.

So, what advice can I give regarding chairs? First, don’t look to a chair as the primary solution to poor posture – remember it’s your posture and so it’s you that has to learn how to change it. But if you have a choice, I recommend very simple, basic designs – fairly flat, reasonably firm bottoms and backs that do not force your torso into any particular shape.

Chairs, Posture and the Alexander Technique

Alexander technique sitting
The standing workstation seems to effectively remove the challenge of sitting altogether. I always wonder though, if those who change permanently from a sitting to standing desk are simply avoiding the problem. Potentially, the misuse which made sitting untenable may present in standing too.
The C curve also presents no contradiction to width through the front and the integration of the arms into the torso. The constructive thinking processes of Alexander Technique is most functional when we have clear concepts. Accurate concepts of the location of the external surfaces mean we can interact with them most effectively.

References:

http://ergonomictrends.com/alexander-technique-exercises-posture-back-pain/
http://alexandertechniqueoc.com/how-to-sit-at-a-computer/
http://alexandertechnique.com/articles/chairs
http://www.poisealexandertechnique.com.au/articles/2014/12/31/in-search-of-the-perfect-office-chair
http://www.poisealexandertechnique.com.au/articles/2018/9/27/what-is-alexander-technique

non interference alexander technique definition

non interference alexander technique definition

Non interference alexander technique definition
Forward head posture originates not only in the cervical muscles, but also in the corresponding pattern of kyphosis that develops in the upper thoracic region. Treatment emphasizes the shortened muscles of the upper anterior torso and posterior cervical region. These hypertonic muscles often develop myofascial trigger points so they can be treated with static compression, deep longitudinal stripping, and eventually with active engagement methods as well. Certain muscles, such as the rhomboids and mid-trapezius that are held in a lengthened position due to this posture, also become painful from fatigue. Similar techniques can be applied to these muscles.
Whitney Lowe LMT, . Leon Chaitow ND DO, in Orthopedic Massage (Second Edition) , 2009

Technically good swimmers understand that the fastest way to swim is to use long, smooth, even strokes that “grip” the water and do not waste energy. However, in the stress of competition, even the best swimmers may be tempted to “forget” this knowledge and resort to making the sort of effort that makes it ”feel” as if they are trying hard to swim fast. This inevitably results in short, jerky strokes that waste energy and actually slow you down.
The quality of our use of ourselves has a profound effect on how we are, 24 hours a day. Many examples of under-performance, as well as posture-related or tension-related pain, and injuries, are unwittingly aggravated, or even caused, through habitually poor use. Learning improved use through the Alexander Technique can lead to surprising improvements; even people suffering with the most intractable conditions often report reduced pain, increased stamina and greater strength. The Alexander Technique does not treat pain and disease, it teaches greater skill in movement and reaction, which in turn enables our natural vitality to assert itself.

Why do people study the Alexander Technique?
The most far-reaching reason people study the Technique is to achieve greater conscious control of their reactions.

Non interference alexander technique definition
Alexander Technique uses the term inhibition in its neurological sense. In Alexander Technique, inhibition is a message ‘to stop doing,’ or ‘to not do.’
In this way, inhibition is reframed from ‘stop doing this’ into ‘do this instead.’ What we choose must contradict the old pattern comprehensively so that the ‘stop doing’ is implicit in the new intention. FM Alexander saw a ubiquitous pulling-down in people. Rather than telling them to ‘stop pulling down,’ he framed it positively and asked for ‘freedom so you can go up.’

In theory, anti-gravity postural support has considerable potential to interfere with movement because it requires muscle activity that is spatially complex, dynamic and ever-present (Gurfinkel et al. 2006), which could act to obstruct motion. A prediction emerging from this hypothesis is that differences in postural control between individuals should lead to differences in the interference effect and consequently in performance of whole body actions such as STS. A relevant observation is that postural support, when active during stance, was found to have substantially different properties in a group of subjects trained to a high level in the Alexander technique (AT) compared with an untrained but otherwise healthy group (Cacciatore et al. 2011a). In essence, the AT group had lower, or more adaptive, hip-joint and axial postural stiffness, as revealed by reduced resistance to externally applied slow mechanical perturbations. Furthermore, in a separate study, the two groups were found to perform the STS action differently (Cacciatore et al. 2011b). When the participants were instructed to rise from a chair at a self-selected speed, but to perform the movement as smoothly as possible without using momentum, the two groups chose similar movement durations, but the AT group achieved a much smoother rise. These two studies, therefore, provide some initial support for the hypothesis that the neuromuscular system for posture interferes with movement. However, it is necessary to rule out other reasonable explanations. For example, the healthy subjects may simply have misunderstood the instructions or been given insufficient feedback about their movements to modify their STS performance appropriately. Another objection is that, because the STS movement was performed at a self-selected speed, participants may have used their habitual movement pattern, thus merely reflecting differences between a trained and an untrained habit. It is also possible that the force distribution between leg joints was somehow different between the two groups, allowing for a smoother execution by the AT group.
While Alexander technique (AT) teachers have been reported to stand up by shifting weight gradually as they incline the trunk forward, healthy untrained (HU) adults appear unable to rise in this way. This study examines the hypothesis that HU have difficulty rising smoothly, and that this difficulty relates to reported differences in postural stiffness between groups. A wide range of movement durations (1–8 s) and anteroposterior foot placements were studied under the instruction to rise at a uniform rate. Before seat-off (SO) there were clear and profound performance differences between groups, particularly for slower movements, that could not be explained by strength differences. For each movement duration, HU used approximately twice the forward center-of-mass (CoM) velocity and vertical feet-loading rate as AT. For slow movements, HU violated task instruction by abruptly speeding up and rapidly shifting weight just before SO. In contrast, AT shifted weight gradually while smoothly advancing the CoM, achieving a more anterior CoM at SO. A neuromechanical model revealed a mechanism whereby stiffness affects standing up by exacerbating a conflict between postural and balance constraints. Thus activating leg extensors to take body weight hinders forward CoM progression toward the feet. HU’s abrupt weight shift can be explained by reliance on momentum to stretch stiff leg extensors. AT’s smooth rises can be explained by heightened dynamic tone control that reduces leg extensor resistance and improves force transmission across the trunk. Our results suggest postural control shapes movement coordination through a dynamic “postural frame” that affects the resistive behavior of the body.

References:

http://www.alexander-technique.london/articles/principles-of-the-alexander-technique/
http://www.amsatonline.org/aws/AMSAT/pt/sp/what_is
http://www.poisealexandertechnique.com.au/articles/2018/9/27/alexander-technique-thinking-inhibition-and-direction
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4122698/
http://www.alexandertechnique.com/at

online classes for teachers

online classes for teachers

Online classes for teachers
Also from Texas Woman’s University, this course gives tips to help you successfully create the navigation, layout, colors and design of your course content.
Originally developed for Texas Woman’s University, this course includes modules showing how to design a course, along with explanations of best practices for distance education.

Online classes for teachers
Prepare for success in the IELTS Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening tests with these four courses from the British Council.
Discover online degrees from leading universities. Develop your knowledge with an undergraduate or postgraduate degree.

Online classes for teachers
Fundamentally, good teaching requires you to be in the classroom with your students. When you teach in person, you don’t leave students to their own devices. You’re with them, engaging in any number of teacherly activities: explaining, guiding, asking, illustrating, answering questions. You arrive early to set up for class. You stay a few minutes afterward to talk one-on-one with a student who needs extra support. You’re present and actively involved. You’re there for your students.
“Online students are lazy/disengaged/(insert negative adjective here).” Many online students are prone to minimal engagement or drifting away from class altogether. Does online education attract a certain type of personality, people who are not highly motivated to succeed? Or have we inadvertently created conditions online that contribute to student disengagement? Things like:

Enrolling in an online course is a fantastic way to invest in your education without the commitment and inconvenience that an on-campus class may demand. An online course gives you access to the class you want to take through a web-based classroom environment. What is an online course in teaching? An online course in teaching is an introductory class that acquaints students with the pedagogical c… Read more
What is an online course in teaching? An online course in teaching is an introductory class that acquaints students with the pedagogical context for the practices and principles that inform teaching. This class may cover the role and responsibility of a teacher as well as the activities and classroom interactions that make for successful teaching. Educational theory and its practical application will likely be explored through case studies and critical analyses. From this coursework, students should develop their own teaching philosophy and foundation for lesson plans.

Language arts, in all of their complexity, can be a challenge for any teacher. Our online offerings include courses on teaching writing, building literacy, understanding media messages, independent reading, and multiple classes on teaching English Language Learners; 17 courses, 1 to 3 credits
Professional development takes place in a lot of ways, top among them reading education-themed books. We recognize this and created series of online courses that are structured through professional reading. Reflective Reading courses focus on such topics as special needs, social and cultural issues, and instructional strategies; the TED courses series spotlights motivation, creativity, learning as a process, change, and exploration; and the Teachers’ Book Study Club empowers groups of teachers to choose a book and learn together; 16 courses, 1 credit.

References:

http://www.futurelearn.com/subjects/teaching-courses
http://www.chronicle.com/interactives/advice-online-teaching
http://www.onlinestudies.com/Courses/Teaching/
http://dominicancaonline.com/online-courses/
http://www.centralia.edu/academics/schedule.aspx

alexander the great teacher

alexander the great teacher

Alexander the great teacher
When Alexander was young, he was taught to fight and ride by Leonidas of Epirus, a relative of his mother Olympias, as well as to endure hardships such as forced marches. His father, Philip, was interested in cultivating a refined future king and so hired Lysimachus of Acarnania to teach the boy reading, writing, and to play the lyre. This tutelage would instill in Alexander a lifelong love of reading and music. At the age of 14, Alexander was introduced to the Greek philosopher Aristotle who Philip hired as a private tutor. He would study with Aristotle for the next three years, and the two remained in correspondence throughout Alexander’s later campaigns.
Alexander III of Macedon, known as Alexander the Great (21 July 356 BCE – 10 or 11 June 323 BCE), was the son of King Philip II of Macedon. He became king upon his father’s death in 336 BCE and went on to conquer most of the known world of his day. He is known as ‘the great’ both for his military genius and his diplomatic skills in handling the various populaces of the regions he conquered. He is further recognized for spreading Greek culture, language, and thought from Greece throughout Asia Minor, Egypt, and Mesopotamia to India and thus initiating the era of the “Hellenistic World”.

Alexander the great teacher
Alexander was saddened when he found his dead body. He respected Darius as the head of the mighty Persian Empire, though Alexander regarded himself as a higher authority because he believed his power came from the gods, according to Abernethy. He sent Darius’s body back to Persepolis and ordered that he be given a royal burial.
In a recently published conference paper, Elpida Hadjidaki, the past director of Maritime Antiquities in the Greek Ministry of Culture, points out that Agis III, the king of Sparta, worked with the Persians to fortify a harbor at Phalasarna, in west Crete. Persia gave him money and ships and in return “Agis sent the money and triremes [a type of ship] to his brother Agesilaos, directing him to pay the salaries of the crews, and to sail directly to Crete to settle the affairs of the island for the benefit of Sparta,” writes Hadjidaki. In his excavations he has found that, with Persian support, the Spartans built fortifications and a larger harbor at Phalasarna.

Greek philosophers were edging towards the radical idea that there were no gods who controlled the destiny of life on earth from some detached mountaintop. Rather, it was man himself who, thanks to his own brainpower, could decipher the laws of the universe to become master of all nature.
Supreme among such thinkers was Aristotle (384BCE-322BCE). The scope of his works was truly immense, covering everything from speculations on the nature of the human soul to the physics of the universe; from city politics and personal ethics to the history of plants and animals; and from public speaking and poetry to music, memory and logic.

Alexander the great teacher
In July 331 Alexander was at Thapsacus on the Euphrates. Instead of taking the direct route down the river to Babylon, he made across northern Mesopotamia toward the Tigris, and Darius, learning of this move from an advance force sent under Mazaeus to the Euphrates crossing, marched up the Tigris to oppose him. The decisive battle of the war was fought on October 31, on the plain of Gaugamela between Nineveh and Arbela. Alexander pursued the defeated Persian forces for 35 miles to Arbela, but Darius escaped with his Bactrian cavalry and Greek mercenaries into Media.
From his accession Alexander had set his mind on the Persian expedition. He had grown up to the idea. Moreover, he needed the wealth of Persia if he was to maintain the army built by Philip and pay off the 500 talents he owed. The exploits of the Ten Thousand, Greek soldiers of fortune, and of Agesilaus of Sparta, in successfully campaigning in Persian territory had revealed the vulnerability of the Persian empire. With a good cavalry force Alexander could expect to defeat any Persian army. In spring 334 he crossed the Dardanelles, leaving Antipater, who had already faithfully served his father, as his deputy in Europe with over 13,000 men; he himself commanded about 30,000 foot and over 5,000 cavalry, of whom nearly 14,000 were Macedonians and about 7,000 allies sent by the Greek League. This army was to prove remarkable for its balanced combination of arms. Much work fell on the lightarmed Cretan and Macedonian archers, Thracians, and the Agrianian javelin men. But in pitched battle the striking force was the cavalry, and the core of the army, should the issue still remain undecided after the cavalry charge, was the infantry phalanx, 9,000 strong, armed with 13-foot spears and shields, and the 3,000 men of the royal battalions, the hypaspists. Alexander’s second in command was Parmenio, who had secured a foothold in Asia Minor during Philip’s lifetime; many of his family and supporters were entrenched in positions of responsibility. The army was accompanied by surveyors, engineers, architects, scientists, court officials, and historians; from the outset Alexander seems to have envisaged an unlimited operation.

Alexander the great teacher
In the summer of 327 Alexander marched toward India. In northern India, he defeated the armies of King Porus. Impressed with his bravery and nobility, Alexander allowed Porus to remain king and gained his loyalty.
By autumn 334 Alexander had crossed the southern coast of Asia Minor (now Turkey). In Asia Minor, Alexander cut the famous Gordian Knot. According to tradition, whoever undid the intricate Gordian Knot would become ruler of Asia. Many people began to believe that Alexander had godlike powers and was destined to rule Asia.

References:

http://www.livescience.com/39997-alexander-the-great.html
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/world-history/aristotle-and-alexander-the-man-who-codified-greek-ideas-about-nature-and-the-man-who-spread-them-1608033.html
http://www.britannica.com/biography/Alexander-the-Great
http://www.notablebiographies.com/A-An/Alexander-the-Great.html
http://www.biography.com/political-figure/alexander-the-great

alexander technique online

alexander technique online

Moreover, many of the Alexander teachers and students who have used Skype find that it offers some distinct advantages over traditional teaching. In particular, it takes away the dependency on an “Alexander fix” that sometimes occurs with traditional teaching. With Skype, it is absolutely clear to students from the very start that that they are engaged in an educational process, not a theraputic one, and that it is up to them to explore and practice using F. Matthias Alexander’s discoveries themselves. For this reason, many of the Alexander Technique teachers who provide distance learning options have found that it is actually a more effective and efficient process than in-person teaching.
Imogen Ragone – More about her Skype work here

Alexander technique online
Here are a few suggestions:
The Complete Guide to the Alexander Technique Page on Facebook provides up-to-date information about the latest Alexander Technique developments from around the world.

A number of Alexander Technique teachers include Skype calls and other distance-learning methods as part of their practice and these may be well worth considering if you’re planning on learning the Technique primarily on your own. You can find a list of these teachers here.

Alexander Technique “lying down”, sometimes called “constructive rest” or “active rest” is a powerful self-help process anyone can do at home. Click here for a variety of videos, audio resources, articles and blogs related to constructive rest

Alexander technique online
Ensuring you can gain a full appreciation and understanding of The Alexander Technique, the course teaches how it has evolved and adapted to become what it is today. In addition to this, you will learn how holistic practices can contribute to the overall health of any individual.

  • Certified Course
  • Accredited Course

Alexander technique online
Using Optical Illusion to reduce pain and tension while improving strength and coordination – Simple, powerful self-help process which may be indirectly inspired by F. Matthias Alexander’s self-discovery process and certainly can be useful for Alexander Technique students.
Below you will find links to videos that can be helpful to Alexander Technique students. For more information on this topic visit Alexander Technique Self Study.

References:

http://www.alexandertechnique.com/atonline/
http://www.alexandertechnique.com/selfstudy
http://www.centreofexcellence.com/shop/alexander-technique-diploma-course/
http://www.alexandervideo.com/alexander-technique-self-study/
http://blogs.umass.edu/onlinetools/community-centered-tools/skype/